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5 Principles to Build a Lean, Scalable SaaS Marketing Strategy [Podcast]

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You want big time SaaS marketing success, but you don't have a big time budget. What do you do?

In this Business RadioX segment, Kenneth Burke of Text Request teams up with Jeremy Boudinet of Ambition to discuss 5 principles to build a lean, scalable SaaS marketing strategy.

Two marketing directors. Two software-as-a-service startups. Way too much coffee, and a ton of helpful nuggets that apply to any digital marketing strategy. Click below to listen, or keep scrolling for the highlights.

1. Create happy, thriving customers to use as your foundation.

You have to build solid relationships with customers. Customer reviews, testimonials, case studies, white papers - these are crucial for boosting your marketing strategy and you overall business!


"I'm basically boys with most of our customers. That's how much we're talking with them well after they purchase." - Jeremy Boudinet


To find success on a large scale, you have to first create it on the individual level. ~80% of a SaaS company's customers (pre-$100k MRR) will be from referrals. You've got to create these thriving, happy customers who will bring others to you.

You've got to let them teach you how to build your product, and how to sell it. That's how you start to build a lean, scalable SaaS marketing program that works.

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2. Align marketing with sales.

Marketing is basically Sales' wing man. One sets up the other for success.

Another way to look at it is that Sales and Marketing should be married to each other. Two become one and grow in unison.

The customer life cycle is just that - a cyle. Marketing hands off to sales who hands off to customer success, then marketing and product development use that information to get more leads and more customers, ad infinitum.

When every "department" in your startup is sending the same, coherent message throughout the cycle, you'll begin to see a scalable SaaS marketing strategy emerge.

Related: 11 Digital Marketing Basics You Need to Eat & Breathe

3. Create EPIC content that you're proud to share.


"It's not enough to just create content. If you're going to create a blog post, make it a freakin' epic blog post." - Jeremy Boudinet


Something like 200,000 pieces of content are uploaded to the internet every minute of every day. Most all of that content is mediocre at best. You need to create content that distinguishes you from that mediocrity!

Create content that you're proud to share. Content that you would want to look back on and reference. Epic content is crucial for a scalable SaaS marketing strategy.

4. There are so many free and cheap tools out there. Use them.

You can't do everything all by yourself. There's so much out there ready to help you!

Maybe it's a pop-up to capture leads. Maybe it's a content sharing widget, or a screen sharing service.

Whatever it is, you can probably find a free or cheap tool to help you. Bit.ly is good for creating short links. Sumo is good for a suite of things. Hootsuite for social media. Exit Monitor for email subscriptions.

Whatever you need is available. You just need to figure out what it is you need, and then go find it.

5. Get interactive and collaborative.


"Some of the best content is that which gets other brands and people involved." - Jeremy Boudinet


Jeremy and Ambition have done "March SaaSness"  in place of March Madness. They hosted a bracket-style tournament for SaaS companies competing against each other for the most votes to find out who's #1.

It worked phenomenally! So well that they did it a second year. About half of the brands got heavily involved in promoting tournament for Ambition, and traffic skyrocketed!

We (Text Request) have done crowd sourced "experts' tips" pieces to get others sharing our content, following the same premise. That's worked well, too. Basically, those who collaborate win.

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