Startup Journal: On Patience and Waiting

Startup Journal on Patience and Waiting

I can’t officially speak for everyone on our team, but I think we would all agree that waiting is the worst.

Patience and waiting – inherently it seems – go against every fiber of the hype that surrounds startups and entrepreneurship.

All of us who’ve been in this world know the hype isn’t accurate. That doesn’t make it any less confusing to navigate!

The startup world is depicted as this incredibly fast-paced environment, packed with booming innovation and drowning in venture capital. Compared to the glacial pace of Fortune 500 companies, this might be true of startups.

Related: Startup Journal: What Personality You Need for a Tech Startup

The big difference is that instead of planning five and ten years out, startups are planning 3 months to 2 years head. Comparatively, this is incredibly quick!

But there’s so much less going on in a startup compared to a major company that this pace can still feel slow. You’re constantly fighting for that next milestone, which often feels forever and a day away.

Princess Bride Startup Journal Patience and Waiting Work

The startup life is depicted as this bustling strife for growth, but it’s really a lot of long, almost boring hours spent trying to figure out or create answers to your own questions.

You could spend months testing a particular marketing strategy or technique, and then you realize you’ve spent a third of your company’s existence on that one thing! It’s a relatively significant chunk of time.

Related: Startup Journal: How Should You Spend Your Time?

That’s what it takes, though, and it can often take much longer to find the right answer! That’s the trouble with patience and waiting. You don’t want to take the time necessary to start growing exponentially.

The dream would be to pivot and see instant improvement as a result. That just doesn’t work. It takes time. And it takes a lot of patience and waiting while you work your tail off.

Being patient and learning to be okay with waiting is a big lesson to learn. Keep your head down. Keep trying to find the right answers. But be patient.

Know that there probably isn’t going to be a simple solution. It’s likely going to take several months, a year, or more to find answers to your questions and to start growing exponentially.

It takes a lot of patience and waiting to create success in a startup. That’s not easy when you want to run at a full sprint! But it’s completely worth it once your baby brand finally takes off.

— Kenneth Burke, Marketing Director

Related: 7 Foundational Small Business Marketing Tips to Drive Exponential Growth