How Many Texts Do People Send Every Day?

How Many Texts People Send

If you just want to know the number of texts people send every day, scroll down. Your numbers are highlighted in red. There’s charts, too! If you want details and explanations, keep reading.

Everyone wants to know how many texts are sent and received every day, and who’s doing all this messaging. The trouble is that this specific research is only conducted every several years. Trends suggest the numbers keep rising, but that’s difficult to confirm in between reports.

How many texts do people send every day? It’s not the easiest question to answer, but here’s everything we know.

Note that app-to-app messaging, such as WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger, is not included in this. (Those two combine for over 60 billion messages every day, in case you were curious.)

Global vs. U.S.

In June of 2014, 561 billion text messages were sent worldwide. That’s the most recent number we’ve got. Obviously that’s a rounded figure, but it brings us to roughly 18.7 billion texts sent every day around the world. (Tweet this!)

By the end of 2011, the United States was sending out 6 billion texts every day, or about 180 billion a month. At that same time – end of year 2011 – there were about 395 billion monthly texts being sent worldwide.

In other words, the U.S. was responsible for about 45% of the world’s texts. Not bad for 4% of the world’s population.

Between the end of 2011 and June 2014, global text usage grew from ~395 billion to 561 billion messages per month. That’s a growth of approximately 140%.

Related: 63 Texting Statistics That Answer All Your Questions

If – strong if – U.S. text usage grew by that same figure, then Americans sent 255 billion texts in June of 2014.

With very rough figures, we’ll extrapolate that the most recent data we have shows 8.5 billion texts sent every day in these here United States of America.

How Many Texts Do People Send Every Day

We do know that 81% of the American population are texters – they text at least on a monthly basis. For round figures, the U.S. has a population of 320 million. 81% of our population equals roughly 259 million people who text.

So. If 259 million people are sending out 8.5 billion texts a day, what does that account to? That’s roughly 32-33 messages per day, per person.

From here, we can keep breaking down the numbers by who owns what device and how old they are, but what’s the point? People under 18 aren’t included in a lot of the data, and those over 65 years old hardly do any texting. But we’ll get to that.

This is arguably the best data available, but we can’t say with complete assurance that it’s 100% accurate for today. Take it with a grain of salt.

By Age Group

The best research we have here is from Pew Research Center in 2011. They conducted another very thorough study towards the end of 2014 (released in April, 2015), but for some reason the new one didn’t include the number of text messages sent.

They did, however, show that text/SMS is the single most used feature on a smartphone, with 97% of all smartphone users having texted within the last week.

Related: 101 Reasons You Might Text Someone Today

Coming in second was audio/video calls with a 92% usage rate, and the internet with an 89% usage rate. Think about that.

On mobile devices (which take up the majority of web traffic), people text more than they use the internet. That’s incredible.

Thankfully, in 2013, Experian Marketing Services released this report, breaking down text usage by demographic. Again, it’s been a few years since their report, which might mean the numbers are dated, but it’s the best public information we’ve got.

Per their report, those between 18-24 years old sent and received an average of 3,853 texts messages per month. In a 30-day month, that’s just over 128 messages per day.

As of 2013, American adults between 18-24 sent and received an average of just over 128 text messages per day.

How Many Texts Do People Send Every Day

The next group is adults 25-34 years old, which, admittedly, is a large age group to include. There’s 3 completely different life stages in this, which leads us to believe that the numbers would be skewed between those 25-29 and those 30-34. But I digress.

People in this age range averaged 2,240 sent and received texts per month. Based on a 30-day month, that’s just under 75 messages per day.

As of 2013, American adults between 25-34 sent and received an average of just under 75 text messages per day.

Those 35-44 years old sent and received an average of 1,557 text messages per month, which comes out to 52 text messages per day.

Adults 45-54 years old sent and received 998 text messages per month, or about 33 messages a day.

The 55+ group averaged 491 messages per month, translating into 16 text messages per day.

Let’s group some of these together for more a “comprehensive” and easy to remember figure (or just a fun fact to toss around). If we generalize these age groups American adults under 45 years old send and receive an average of 2,550 messages a month, or about 85 text messages per day. (Tweet this!)

Related: 8 Benefits of Texting for Business That You Desperately Need

5 Reasons Why Millennials Prefer Texting Over Voice Mail

People Prefer Texting Over Voice Mail

We've talked before about how no one listens to their voice mail. We've talked before about how, generally, people prefer to text and be texted over any other form of communication. Now we're going to put two and two together.

Over 90% of people who text - at all, for any reason, in any capacity - prefer texts over voice mail. To put that into perspective, as of 2013, over 90% of adults own a cell phone, and over 80% of them text. Sadly, these numbers are skewed by the 65+ crowd, whose generally poor eyesight and often feeble fingers make texting impractical. But if you narrow the numbers down to just the working class, over 95% own cell phones and every single one of them texts.

But why do we prefer texting over voice mail? In both situations, the person checking the message gets a notification and has to go through the same amount of steps to see or hear what was left for them. If you're leaving the message, it's probably easier for you to leave a voice mail after a call than hanging up to text them. (Though that begs the question as to why you would bother calling someone anyway, when you know the person isn't likely to pick up the phone.)

What is it about texting that makes the overwhelming majority prefer it over voice mail? If you're under 25, you've probably never even thought about this question. Why would you? Texting's just what you do. It's how you communicate. Even most Millennials (people roughly 20-45 y.o.) would have a hard time articulating an answer, because texting's just what people do. But for the outliers who might not understand why so many people prefer texting over voice mail, let's be very clear.

1. Voice mail usually takes too long.

Who are the people in this day and age that leave you voice mail? It's your mother - maybe your grandmother - who rambles on, speaking slowly and sporadically for two minutes until you realize she just wanted to check in, at which point you end the voice mail before it's finished playing. Or it might be a client that you're not very close with asking you to do something, or a telemarketer begging you to call them back. No one who's trying to get ahead in life wants to take that kind of time out of their day so someone else can ask them to do something, especially not dozens of times everyday.

2. Voice mail is impersonal.

Think about the people that leave you voice mail. It's either business contacts you're not close to, salesmen wasting their time, senior citizens, or someone who has no other mode of contact for you. If someone close to you wanted to get in touch, they'd either message you on social media or text you. When people see they have a voice mail (if they see it), they automatically know it's from someone who's not close to them and who's over 50. That's not a very good impression to make.

3. Voice mail can be difficult to hear.

God forbid you're around other people or walking somewhere that has noise! How many times have you been on the phone and hung up, or had to leave the room, because things were too loud around you? How many times, back in the day, have you listened to voice mail and had to replay the message several times because the caller either didn't speak clearly enough, or because there was noise in their background? It's really annoying. It's not inconvenient at all. And the comparison - texting - is that you're given a written message with everything you need to know, and the best way to reach the person leaving that message.

4. Voice mail still makes you write a message.

A message should be something given to you that you can instantly run with, not something you have to replay three times and take notes on before it's worth anything. If somebody texts you, you already have a written record of everything you need to know, whether it be notes, someone's phone number, an address, or anything else. And you can carry as many of these easy-to-use, informational messages around with you as you could possibly want!

5. Voice mail carries no urgency.

If it's not urgent, people are going to forget about it. Nothing about a voice mail notification says "This is important, and needs attention right now!" If someone can't answer your call, there's good reason to believe they won't be able to listen to your voice mail for some time either. Rather, with a text, the receiver sees the message as soon as it comes in (or within three minutes), and can choose to pay attention to that message right then or leave it for later.

People prefer to text. If this article doesn't tell you that, watching people walk down the street will. Voice mail was great back in the day, but it's not how we communicate now. It's outdated, inefficient, and actually causes more problems than it solves (just ask Coca-Cola and JP Morgan Chase). Voice mail is dead. If you want to reach someone, and if you want to hear back from them, you need to text.

How Over 80% of People Are Texting for Business

Text Request People Texting for Business Professional Purposes

People are texting for business all the time! They text to schedule a meeting, to check in with someone, to send a quick reminder, to wish a client a happy birthday, to talk business ideas, even to shore up and grow new business.

We text. It's just what we do. Texting is a natural extension of our own voice, and integrates seamlessly with our day-to-day lives. It's really interesting to look around and see how many people are using their mobile devices, what exactly they're using them for, and how they're communicating with others through them. While individuals embrace these new technologies and use them to benefit their own day-to-day lives, it's a rare occurrence when a business as an entire unit takes advantage of these incredible technologies.

If you're a gym, it's really easy and makes a lot of sense to incorporate one or several fitness apps into what you and your personal trainers do everyday. It completes the customer experience, and probably makes operations more efficient.

If you're an accounting firm, something like Drop Box makes perfect sense, because you and your clients can quickly and easily share important documents with each other, securely, from anywhere.

If you're a school, ebooks are a great tool because there's so many kids who don't have access to (or funds to purchase) books, and ebooks can help remedy that situation.

What does your business use technology for? What technologies do you wish you were using?

Technology is a beautiful thing! Sure, it comes with additional responsibilities, but the benefits when used appropriately are astronomical!

Texting is a technology that we all use. It's a staple of how we communicate. Individuals text for countless reasons every single day. And over 80% of professionals include texting for business in their tool belts to boost their careers. So why is it that only a handful of businesses have started having text conversations as a business unit?

Most businesses are constantly trying to catch up with where they need to be. That's just the way it is. Leaders see a few people do things one way, and eventually they start to do the same with their respective brands.

Texting - for full conversations, not just marketing - hasn't caught up with the mainstream of business communication, but the innovative leaders out there have begun to integrate texting into their professional, business communication as an organizational unit - complete with a clickable text number on their website.

They're using these business text numbers to have full conversations about anything from scheduling appointments to creating leads to closing sales to general communications to friendly reminders - really for every reason you as an individual might text someone. But they're doing it as a unit. They're doing it in a way that's manageable as a whole organization, in a way where they can have five or ten people (or everyone) from the same business texting for that business, and be able to keep tabs on who said what to whom and when.

We use mobile technologies every single day for hundreds of reasons, from leisure to education to communication. Most people text everyday to boost their business. And several businesses as entire units have started to incorporate texting for full conversations into their strategies - with impressive results, I might add. When will you make the jump?

Customers Want to Be Able to Text You

Text Request People wish text conversation with business

People want to text. Your customers want to text.

If you don't believe that, look around. The average cell phone owner under 50 sends and receives over 85 texts every single day!

People texting with people is a staple of everyday communication. It's just what we do. Want to catch up with family? Text. Need a report finished? Text. Confirming a meeting? Text. Seeing if so-and-so wants to do dinner? Text.

The go-to form of communication for the majority of the world's population is text messaging.

That's for person-to-person. Where is this in business communication? A lot of businesses use automated marketing texts, but where's the conversation with a real person through text? That's how we communicate. Businesses should as well.

Real-time, two-way text messaging is the largest void in business communication.

The worst part about it is that this gaping hole is leaving millions of people dissatisfied with service options and with companies as a whole.

89% of consumers want another customer service option. 79% are unhappy with what's currently provided to them. And (at least) 78% of people who text wish they could have a text conversation with a business.

As a business, you know that you have to give customers what they want, or they're not going to work with/buy from you. What most customers want these days is an easier way to do things. So give them an easier way to communicate with you.

Most website traffic comes from mobile devices. When someone's on your website, which they probably found on their smart phone, how easy would it be if they could just click a button that opened a text addressed to your business? Very easy.

There's two main benefits of this.

One - people prefer texting, generally, because they can do it as much as they want on their own time, without having to worry about it interrupting their day.

Two - Customers absolutely detest waiting on hold, they don't like live chat options because they have to stay in one place to use them, and it takes too long for people to read and respond to emails to act as a real-time conversation.

But people love the flexibility of texting. They can carry on short or lengthy conversations whenever they want throughout the day.

Billions of conversations are had through text every single day. The overwhelming majority of consumers are currently unhappy with customer service options. They want to text with your business.

How to Get Nearly 50% More Money From Your Customers

Text Request Nurtured Leads Make Larger Purchases

You want to make more money, right? You want to be the best rep, employee, manager, location, business, entrepreneur, etc., and you want to grow.

A significant part of this is maximizing customer potential, or how much each customer is willing to give you. But how do you do this?

Think about your relationships with friends and family.

You talk regularly, if not all the time. You go out together. You help them move. You buy gifts for each other. And you're generally willing to do a lot more for these people than for some random stranger.

You're willing to give more to these people because you have better relationships with them. This same phenomenon occurs between consumers and businesses. 

Obviously you can't be best friends with every single one of your customers. And you don't really need to be. What you do need is to stand out from your competition. You need to build a better relationship with customers and potential customers than the other guys would.

Nurtured leads (potential customers you or your brand have built relationships with) will make an average of 47% larger purchases than leads who haven't been nurtured.

Example:

You like using Amazon because it's quick, and because you don't have to leave your seat to get what you want. You could go pick up the exact same thing from Walmart or Barnes&Noble or Lowe's and not have to wait or pay for shipping. But if you're like most people, you go back to Amazon again and again and again. Why? Because they're constantly nurturing you.

Every time you click on an item, you'll notice that Amazon recommends other, similar items. They see you've chosen one thing with x, y, and z characteristics, so they refer you to something else they think might help you during your hunt for the perfect item. After you purchase, you get emails and follow-ups recommending other items that should appeal to you based on your purchase(s). They're constantly there with you, and are politely working to create more and larger purchases from you.

Because of this nurturing, you spend a lot more on Amazon goods, and a lot less at other places.

Most businesses, particularly small businesses, rely on regular and direct communication to build relationships with (potential) customers - either through the sales team, seeing people around town, regular newsletters, or some other form of correspondence- to nurture them and try to get larger purchases out of them.

If you're a business that needs regular communication with individuals, which you probably are, it will help your customer service and your bottom line to text with these individuals.

Let's say a lead comes in from an email, online form, text, signup sheet, etc. You can easily follow up with that lead by sending them a text to give them the information they need, to check in down the road, to let them know you're always easily reachable should they need anything else or have questions, and to generally create an open line of communication.

You text with your friends and family all the time. And you're much more likely to spend more on them because you're constantly building those relationships. It's not an if-text-then-buy, causal relationship. But texting goes hand-in-hand with establishing and building relationships. It's easy, it's personal, it's natural.

By doing something as powerfully simple as texting with your (potential) customers, you're furthering relationships and your brand. You're nurturing leads. You're providing better service, and you're standing out from your competition.

By texting with your leads, you'll be able to command more of their dollars, and ensure your business is their go-to choice anytime you could possibly be an option.

People Under 50 Prefer Texting to All Other Communication

Text Request Texting Most Prevalent Communication Under 50

"Digital Natives" are typically recognized as Millennials and today's teenagers who've all grown up using cell phones and the internet. But they're not the only ones who've integrated these technologies into their daily lives.

According to a recent (and rather thorough) Gallup poll, "sending and receiving text messages is the most prevalent form of communication for American adults under 50."

That's astounding! Especially when you think about how texting and mobile trends are perceived. They're often thought of as applying to hip, under-35 crowd who were "young enough" to appreciate new technologies as they came out.

But mobile usage is so much larger than that. Texting is the number one form of communication, and yet businesses and organizations across the board are neglecting to harness it in a professional and manageable way.

Maybe you think, "Well, a lot of businesses work with older demographics, so it doesn't really apply there." Au contraire mon frere!

Texting's the most common way for anyone under 50 to communicate, and well over half of those older than 50 text as well!

Texting is native to Millennials, but they're not the only ones who do it, nor the only ones to do it often.

Businesses and the people who work for them: why are you not using the world's #1 preferred form of communication to actually hold conversations, to build relationships with people and grow your organization?

Do you want to gain more leads? Do you want to service customers better? Would you like to leave people happier, and steal consumers away from your competition? Of course you would. That's what business is all about!

So why not use a simple tool that everyone wants to use, but that businesses have not made a staple? Stand out! Give the people what they want. Meet consumers where they are, and join the conversation. Text.